Entries by Ornella

Venetians, the art of navigation

Without doubt the Veneto people were skilled sailors, as they had travelled the seas and climbed rivers to get here. From the archaeological finds and historic documents, we have discovered they were in contact with other distant peoples and that they used to import goods via water, which they then traded with the mountain peoples. […]

Year 1100 B.C.

The great plain covered by dense forests of oak, beech, poplar, elm and durmast extended as far as you could see from dawn to dusk, while to the north there were the first great plateaus with a hint of the taller peaks beyond. To the south the clear, bright air announced the sea, that all […]

Full to the brim

One of my most vivid recollections of my childhood is tied to Raboso. I had an aunt who ran an inn with a ‘casoin’, a space selling bread and food products, which is how things were then, like a bazaar. My aunt was both host and trader, and I envied her skill of folding a […]

The taste of traditions

  Of that farming world that Bepi knew, very little remains. Those who worked the land have chosen different paths, and progress has brought both wealth and loss of identity. Little or nothing remains of the traditions and he who witnessed an era that has faded can now only rely on his memories. “I have […]

Between history and memory

Everyone did what they could to make a bit of money or put something extra on the meagre dining table: the children captured birds that their mothers plucked and cooked, they hunted moles so they could sell their soft skin to the rich ladies, and they kept the pig bones to sell them to the […]

The King of coffee, from Fossabiuba to Brasil

In 1886, Nicolò and Luigia Lunardelli, a young married couple decided to leave their family and home in Fossabiuba di Mansuè and join the many emigrants who were heading for Brazil. He was 25 and she was 22, and they took their one year old son Geremia with them with their hearts full of hopes for […]

Girolamo Bruni, the silkworm scientist

Archpriest of Mansuè, born in Ceneda in 1720, Pre’ Bruni spent a good part of his eighty two years observing, studying, analysing and improving, not only how silkworms were bred but also how to improve the mulberry tree cultivation methods. He did it with a charitable heart, to increase production and, with his research and […]

An ancient artistic jewel among the gently rolling fields

Beginning from the VII century, there have been fifty five Benedictine monasteries in the dioceses of Ceneda and Treviso. The Basalghelle monastery was served by the Church of SS Mauro and Macario, born in the XI century along Via dei Sali that lead from Portobuffolè to Cadore, a trading route for salt and cereals from […]